INSIDE THIS MONTH: AUGUST

AUGUST 6 | You're Invited: Modern Southwest Party

All the best ideas for throwing a party with a modern southwest theme.  Think graphic color, inventive cocktails, and re-imagined southwestern food.

AUGUST 11 | Business of Design: Website & Logo

You never get any where without putting one foot in front of the other.  Learn why you need a website and why you might not need a logo.

AUGUST 18 | Six Degrees: Audrey King

You are probably only six degrees aways from the gal behind some of Savannah's loveliest events and styling, Audrey King.  Get to know her in this regular series spotlighting my fellow entrepreneurs.

AUGUST 20 | Book Report: The Stuff of Life by Hilary Robertson

Purchase your copy now to let me know your thoughts when I do my review of this moody book about styling...or wait to see if I think you should add this to your shelf.

QUOTE OF THE MONTH

be-generous-with-your-creative-spirit-susanna-salk-on-capella-kincheloe-interior-design-phoenix
tweet of the month jimmy fallon on Capella Kincheloe Interior Design August 2014

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

  • I'm tweeting, instagramming, and on pinning now as a single handle: @Capella_Golden (because everything I touch turns to gold.  Kidding! actually it's my middle name)
  • If you're in the Phoenix area, please join me for our monthly Creative Council happy hours.  You can get event info here: Creative Council. Stay tuned for the August date!
  • I tried this for a brunch I hosted this past weekend and let me tell you - everybody loved it.  Loved it.
  • A simple way to free your mind and enhance your creativity.

WHAT THE PROS KNOW: CHINTZ

What the Pros Know chintz on capella kincheloe interior design phoenix 1. Tree Poppy Union by Colefax and Fowler 2. Chintz Indian Textiles for the West 3. Christies  4. Meredith's Mercantile 5. Design for Chintz by William Kilburn 6. Elizabeth by Schumacher

PRONOUNCE: Chints

WHAT: Glazed fabric usually with a floral or bold pattern.

HISTORY: Chintz originated in India, strictly speaking it is a glazed fabric, but modernly it is known more for the grandmotherly floral patterns rather than the glaze.  The Indian woodblock was printed on the calico (muslin) fabric and put through a process called calendaring to get the shiny glaze.  During calendaring the fabric is put through rollers that put pressure and heat on the fabric resulting in a glaze.  The glaze is not permanent and fades with time & use.  Chintz was being imported from India into Europe at an alarming rate for the government, who banned chintz imports in France and England.

USES: Not to worry, chintz is no longer contraband and has enjoyed a resurgence in popularity in the past few years.  Now, you can do a lot of chintz or just a little with a pillow or lampshade.  Keep it modern by mixing it with animal prints or ikat.  Also works great with fun, bright colors and geometrics.  Can add a wonderful amount of history to a room, like a chair passed down from your chic English grandmother, because who's to know your Grams was born in New Jersey?

Michael Smith Bel Air in Elle Decor
*This post originally appeared on La Dolce Vita Blog, I am continuing my contributor series there today by delving into the glamorous world of passementerie.

THE BUSINESS OF DESIGN: BILLS LADEN WITH HIDDEN COSTS

10 things interior designers won't tell you - my bills are laden with hidden costs

To read more about the article that started this series, start at Part 1 here.

MY BILLS ARE LADEN WITH HIDDEN COSTS

Though most designers will send you invoices for what they're purchasing, it's easy to hide all sorts of costs by being vague. "Draperies for living room; materials and labor, $3,000," doesn't tell you a whole lot, does it?

The way to cover yourself is to demand details -- lots of details. You should always ask that material costs -- fabric, trim, lining, padding -- be accounted for separately from labor costs. Never let the designer buy anything without sending you a detailed invoice, as well as a picture or sample of the product, the quantity you're getting and the price. Stipulate in writing that the only fees the designer can receive are those you've agreed upon. True, not every designer will agree to these demands, but it's worth asking.

It's a bit more of a long shot, but you could also ask to have copies of all bills from outside contractors sent directly to you. "That way, the designer can't add anything on without going through monumental contortions," says Eleanor Windman, who runs the Rent-a-Decorator service in New York.

Again, my business is based on transparency, so there are no costs I am hiding.  To prove it, here is a real-life example of a proposal that was sent to a client in January.  See how the fabric and chair costs are separate?  You see each and every line item - the "other costs" is freight and is indicated as freight in the subtotal and if I charged a markup/ design fee that would also be indicated on a separate line.  Crystal clear. 

 

Sample-Proposal

Now it is true that not all designer's follow my processes, so if you are concerned with what may be hiding in your bills, ask your designer to review it with you.  This is a relationship and you need to be comfortable with what you are paying.  Not only that, but it is also important for insurance purposes in the case something needs to be replaced to know what it's true value is.

You designer may not be willing to share all her invoices with you, but you could ask to spot check an invoice or two to make sure that she is being honest.  This may or may not be a deal-breaker for you.

read the entire series:

1. SHOP IN THE RIGHT STORE AND YOU MAY NOT EVEN NEED ME 2. MY TITLE DOESN’T MEAN VERY MUCH 3. YOU MIGHT AS WELL USE MY ESTIMATE AS WALLPAPER 4. YOU’D SAVE A BUNDLE IF YOU KNEW HOW I SET MY FEES 5. MY BILLS ARE LADEN WITH HIDDEN COSTS 6. IT’S NOT IN MY INTEREST TO HUNT FOR BARGAINS 7. YOU DON’T NEED ME TO GET BIG DISCOUNTS FROM SHOWROOMS 8. I PREFER BIG PROJECTS, BUT I’LL TAKE WHATEVER I CAN GET 9. YOU HAVE LITTLE OR NO RECOURSE IF I SCREW UP 10. MY WORK IN ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST IS A MIRAGE

DO THESE 7 THINGS BEFORE MOVING TO A NEW HOUSE

do these 7 things before moving to a new house lou My plan was to have the "After" images from my Exterior House Paint project.  But there are still little pieces of blue tape everywhere for touch-ups and we still need to put everything back in place.

Instead I wanted to share tips on moving into a new house.  These little and fairly inexpensive things will go a long way in making your new-to-you house feel like your home.

1. CHANGE THE LOCKS & REPLACE MIS-MATCHED DOOR HARDWARE.

Change the locks on all your doors, you never know how many spare keys are floating around.  This is an excellent opportunity to put all the locks on a single key.  Also if your hardware was like ours when we moved in, you have yellow shiny brass knobs next to polished nickel deadbolts and it'll all look better to choose a single finish and run it through your home.  Can't afford new hardware?  Check out this DIY from Young House Love.

Phoenix Interior Design

 

2. CLEAN

Clean everything.  Before a single box gets moved into your new home, you must have everything cleaned.  The baseboards, the highest shelves in the closet, fan blades, light fixtures, under the kitchen sink, behind the stove & refrigerator, wipe down light switches, replace the toilet seats, the closet rod, everything.  It is much easier to powerwash the garage floor without a thing in it.  It is easier to have your wood floors waxed without furniture in the room.

3. PAINT

A fresh coat of paint in a color of your choosing will make your house feel more like yours.  Check out my favorite interior paint colors if you're stumped.

4. REPLACE MIS-MATCHED ELECTRICAL PLATES & SWITCHES

If you have an older home, it is likely that over the years cover plates were moved, changed, and added.   Meaning you could have three or four different outlet & switch covers.  I even had a red outlet, until I realized someone had just painted over it.  Hire an electrician to replace dated, yellowed, or painted electrical outlets and switches to a uniform color throughout your home.  Unless your walls are creamy, I prefer white.

Phoenix Interior Design

5. REPLACE DATED LIGHT FIXTURES

Designer secret shame time.  "Replace hall fixture" has been on my to-do list for almost 2 years now.  It even has a bulb that is burned out.  There are so many great, stylish, & inexpensive fixtures available, that there is no excuse.  Don't feel house shame, replace those ugly old fixtures immediately.

Phoenix Interior Design

6. HIRE PROFESSIONALS TO CLEAN CHIMNEY, SERVICE HVAC & OTHER HOME SYSTEMS.

To keep your house in great working order you need to have your systems regularly serviced.  You never know how good the previous owners were at upkeep.

7. SET UP THE SECURITY ALARM.

What things do you do before you move into a new home or apartment?

BOLD BLACK & WHITE ENTRY STRIPES

bold black & white entry stripes by phoenix interior designer capella kincheloeEntries and powder rooms are two great places to inject bold pattern and color.  When guests walked into my home, they were greeted with nothing special.  On the left is a long wall and on the right a large opening to our dining room.  The first impression wasn't impressing anyone. before & after entry by capella kincheloe interior design

I knew that I wanted to hang ledges for art and photographs.  I also knew that it would be a great wall to add color or pattern because you can see a bit of it from the dining room and a bit sitting on the sofa in the living room and it was just begging for something.  I went classic, black and white stripes.  I choose China White because I didn't want anything too stark, china white is a bit creamy and goes well with the rest of my whitish walls.  The black is Jet Black by Benjamin Moore.  I thought the stripes would guide guests into the main part of the house and my brother sang "Welcome to the Jailhouse" when he saw it.  Thanks, Kai.  But as I put the final frames on it this morning, I was quite pleased with my little project.

phoenix entry black & white stripes by Capella Kincheloe Interior Design

I wanted medium size stripes about 5" and when I measured - it turned out I could get 15 stripes at 5.5" each.  I taped off each section, painted the white paint over the tape seam to help "seal" the tape and prevent the black from bleeding through.  It generally worked, for a few little spots that bled beyond the tape I touched up with a tiny artist's brush.  I had this rug on memo for a client and threw it down.  It fits perfectly.  If they don't buy it, I may have to consider....

I'd love to hear your thoughts, would you consider doing this in your own home?